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American Collection

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Displaying results 261-265 (of 500)
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Jules Kirschenbaum Kirschenbaum
U.S. 1930-2000
Meditations on Death: J. Christ 75.0015

Meditations on Death: J. Christ 75.0015

In the early 1970s, Jules Kirschenbaum began a series of metaphorical paintings on mortality using famous literary and historical figures: Meditations on Death. In these, Kirschenbaum included quotations from some of his favorite Symbolist poems and from other twentieth-century literary sources, while referencing medieval and Gothic architecture, still-life painting, and everyday objects from his studio. The theme of memento mori (remember mortality), often present in Dutch still-life paintings, is very strong in this series, as is the technique of collage. In this painting, Kirschenbaum has imbedded a red thread into the paint surface (as well as painting the word on the surface), a symbol, said the artist of the way in which a fragile element can hold everything together. Kirschenbaum's particular style of Realism developed from twin interests. At an early age he was drawn to the work of medieval and Renaissance artists, to their love of contour and form, the amount of detail in their paintings, their use of perspective, and also to the ways in which they used metaphors and stories. Kirschenbaum's other interest was in modern abstraction, an area he explored while studying with painter Hans Hofmann.

Matthew Kluber
U.S. b. 1959
Figure N, 88 89.0031

Figure N, 88 89.0031

Lee Krasner
U.S. 1908-1984
Primary Series: Gold Stone 79.0084

Primary Series: Gold Stone 79.0084

Jacob Landau
U.S. b. 1917
Mark Twain OP 296

Mark Twain OP 296

Jacob Landau's work reflects his love of the picture surface, of papers, and of inks. Longtime printmaker and teacher at the Pratt Institute in New York, Landau was especially drawn to writers, both past and present, as subject matter. His portrait of American storyteller and cultural critic Mark Twain (Samuel Clemens, 1835-1910) communicates the force of Clemens's personality as it literally reminds us of the wood surface from which the print comes. Clemens himself clearly understood the printing process. His first job was as a printer's apprentice in the late 1840s.

Leonardo Lasansky
U.S. b. 1946
Tomas 79.0070

Tomas 79.0070

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