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American Collection

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Keith Jacobshagen
U.S. b. 1941
A warm Day Cooling 97.0001

A warm Day Cooling 97.0001

Keith Jacobshagen's Nebraska landscapes represent rural life and wide-open spaces. His studio compositions are based upon small plein air works. Low horizon lines increase the feeling of breadth and open air. The images are filled with particulars and universals, a small brushfire or mailbox or flock of crows set against a spectacular sunset. Jacobshagen frequently annotates his works in the lower margin with time of day or weather conditions or even autobiographical phrases to lend a sense of specificity to the landscape.

Carl Paul Jennewein
U.S., b. Germany 1890-1978
Child and Dolphin 48.0871

Child and Dolphin 48.0871

Luis Jimenez
U.S.
El Buen Pastor (The Good Shepherd) 2002.0006

El Buen Pastor (The Good Shepherd) 2002.0006

This print commemorates the fatal shooting in 1997 of Esequiel Hernandez, Jr., an eighteen-year-old Mexican-American who was shot by U.S. marines outside of Redford, Texas near the Mexican border while he was herding his family's goats. Unknown to Esequiel or any citizens of Redford, four marines had been camped along the Rio Grande for three days. They mistook Hernandez for a drug smuggler. Jiménez has portrayed Hernandez in the classic pose of Christ, the Good Shepherd, replacing Christ's traditional halo with a rifle's scope sighting.

Luis Jimenez
U.S.
Tan Lejos de Dios, Tan Cercas de los Estados Unidos (So far from God; so close to the U.S.) 2002.0005

Tan Lejos de Dios, Tan Cercas de los Estados Unidos (So far from God; so close to the U.S.) 2002.0005

In numerous works Luis Jiménez has addressed the problems of the Mexican-American community, Texas myths, and the culture clash between Anglo and Mexican cultures on the border. Jiménez'z monumental and heroic sculpture, Border Crossing, Jiménez specifically tackles the problem of illegal immigration into the U.S. from Mexico: the figure of a man carrying a woman and child on his back conveys the emotional message of the promise of a better life and escape from a life of struggle. In So Far from God; So Close to the United States, Jiménez has reused this imagery as the focal point for a larger group of illegal immigrants, pursued by snarling coyotes, impeded by razor wire, and hunted by the border patrol. They are "guided" by one of the gang members who specialize in taking illegals across the border for large sums of money.

Jasper Johns
U.S. b. 1930
Watchman 2000.0012

Watchman 2000.0012

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