collection

American Collection

Browse by Artist: A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z

Displaying results 6-10 (of 62)
 |<  <  1 - 2 - 3 - 4 - 5 - 6 - 7 - 8 - 9 - 10  >  >| 
William Merritt Chase
U.S. 1849-1916
Still Life with Brass Kettle 31.0015

Still Life with Brass Kettle 31.0015

William Merritt Chase painted portraits, still-lifes, interior spaces, and landscapes, and he depicted fish still-lifes like no other. This painting portrays a great interest in different lighting effects on objects, particularly the glowing reflections shown in the brass kettle. Chase attended the National Academy of Design in New York and later also studied in Munich with the help of some generous patrons. After absorbing all that he could in Munich and rejecting an opportunity to teach, he returned to America to paint. Chase helped to develop a growing interest in art in America in the 1880s, at a time when it was of little importance to the American public, by initiating art classes, schools, and exhibitions. In addition, he was a leader in the "Society of American Art." After the turn of the century, however, he left the Society to join the artistic group known as the "Ten," famous for their elegant depiction of American life.

Christine Chisholm
U.S. unknown
Felucca (sailing vessel) OP 27

Felucca (sailing vessel) OP 27

Christine Chisholm
U.S. unknown
Travelers OP 26

Travelers OP 26

Chunghi Choo
U.S. b. 1938
Tea Service 97.0004

Tea Service 97.0004

Chunghi Choo's flowing, organic shapes belie the rigidity of their silver-plated copper base, fusing American craftsmanship with traditional Asian calligraphy. "I believe that the sweeping movements of the brush in calligraphy have influenced my work," she has said. This explains the graceful upward swing of the handles, which are airily dismissive of function. It also helps to explain the delicacy of the vessels' bodies, which settle under the handles like silken pouches. Chunghi Choo is best known for developing and refining an industrial electroforming process for use in the studio when traditional metalworking tools and techniques proved inadequate for achieving the fluidity she envisioned. Choo models her vessels in wax, applies metallic-conductive silver lacquer by brush, and then immerses the painted model in an electrically-charged solution of copper. When the copper deposit reaches the desired thickness the wax model is "melted out." After refining the surface by filing, sanding, and polishing, Choo heavily plates it with sterling silver.

Warrington Colescott
U.S. unknown
Judgment Day at NEA 94.0013

Judgment Day at NEA 94.0013

The subject of this print, the funding allocated by the National Endowment for the Arts, provided Warrington Colescott with a wide and tempting target. The Federal agency came under fire in the 1990s for grants awarded to controversial artists and projects. Colescott refers to one of the most controversial awards in the foreground-someone on the panel is looking at a Robert Mapplethorpe exhibition catalogue. Critics have frequently commented upon the carnival-like atmosphere of Colescott's work. His subversive look at Americans, "in all of their avid rapaciousness," as one critic has said, sheds light on all sorts of characters, hard, flabby, self-righteous, bored, greedy, calculating, and small-minded. The combination results in slicing satirical looks at contemporary issues and politics.

Displaying results 6-10 (of 62)
 |<  <  1 - 2 - 3 - 4 - 5 - 6 - 7 - 8 - 9 - 10  >  >|