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American Collection

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Displaying results 1-5 (of 19)
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Emil Ganso
U.S. 1895-1941
Portrait of a Woman 47.0856

Portrait of a Woman 47.0856

Largely self-taught, Emil Ganso came to the U.S. from Halberstadt, Germany, in 1912, and taught at the University of Iowa. Influenced by the work of Henri Matisse and the Fauves, his use of acidic colors and expressive line creates a vibrant, emotional portrait of this unknown sitter.

Sanford Robinson Gifford
U.S. 1823-1880
Lake Scene 80.0035

Lake Scene 80.0035

Sanford Robinson Gifford is most remembered for works such as Lake Scene, with its curved sweep of deserted shoreline, and the mirrored surface of the water. Although Gifford began his career in New York as a portraitist, in 1843 he became attracted to the American landscape, departing on a sketching tour through the Catskill and Berkshire mountains in 1846. Frequent trips to Europe (once in the company of Albert Bierstadt) and to the American West as far as Alaska, satisfied Gifford's search for new and unique imagery and served as inspiration for some of his finest paintings. Thomas Cole was an overarching influence on most mid-century American landscapists, and directly influenced Gifford. However, Gifford preferred a "purer" landscape devoid of allegorical references and heroic scale. The artist is now most remembered as belonging to the "luminist" branch of the Hudson River School. These artists were drawn to qualities of subtle yet dramatic light and atmosphere and frequently painted uninhabited scenes. The end result evokes a quiet and an almost "airless" landscape, as in Lake Scene.

Jane E. Gilmor
U.S. b. 1947
Jack's weeds II 91.0053a,b

Jack's weeds II 91.0053a,b

Reuben Lucius Goldberg
U.S. 1883-1970
Untitled (Drunken Figure) 2003.0053

Untitled (Drunken Figure) 2003.0053

Clayton Gorder
U.S. 1936-1987
Nickelodeon V 80.0002

Nickelodeon V 80.0002

Gorder's pop image of this purveyor of popular music is painted on a shaped canvas-an approach adopted by several artists in the 1960s and 70s, such as Frank Stella and Elizabeth Murray, who desired to release painting from the traditional rectangular format. The nickelodeon was a constant theme in Clayton Gorder's work for several years. "It conjures up in my mind a specific image of loud music and pulsating color-of immediacy, sensuality and kinetic rhythm. The nickelodeon suggests a lively mechanical life-force, positive, and direct, that is the perfect vehicle for my own formal leanings."

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