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American Collection

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Joseph Raffael
U.S. b. 1933
Endless Journey 87.0009

Endless Journey 87.0009

In the early 1970s, Joseph Raffael began to paint fish, as well as that most illusive of subjects, moving water. He also began using photography to aid him in capturing certain illusionistic qualities on canvas. Endless Journey depicts a carp, a Japanese symbol of good fortune, swimming through sparkling water. Raffael admires the aesthetic qualities of Japanese art as well as its creative union of the individual and nature. While Raffael was studying art at the Cooper Union in New York, one of his instructors encouraged him to think of himself as a visual poet. This attitude, along with extensive training in color theory that he received at Yale from the legendary teacher, Josef Albers, formed his intense attachment to color, its arrangement on the canvas and its ability to represent light.

Robert Rauschenberg
U.S. b. 1925
Storyline from the series Ground Rules 99.0009

Storyline from the series Ground Rules 99.0009

5-color intaglio in an edition of 44 w/ 7 artist's proofs and 4 printer's proofs 5 printings/5 copper plates on an etching press by Lorena Salcedo-watson, Jihong Shi, Bruce Wankel, and Craig Zammiello The paper is arches En Tout Cas and was hand torn to 47 1/2 x 33 3/8 The plates were preserved for future consideration by the aritst.

Robert Rauschenberg
U.S. b. 1925
Support 80.0007

Support 80.0007

Doel Reed
U.S. b. 1984
Mountain Village OP 143

Mountain Village OP 143

Frederic Remington
U.S. 1861-1909
Bronco Buster 63.1071

Bronco Buster 63.1071

In 1895, Frederic Remington tried his hand at sculpting, beginning with a variation on the traditional equestrian statue, substituting a cowboy for the heroic leader and angling the horse. The result, Bronco Buster, became the classic model for all later representations of the American horse and its rider. Perhaps no other western artist other than Charles Russell has more comprehensively captured the myth of the American cowboy. Born in Canton, New York, and educated at Yale, Remington set out at age nineteen, upon the death of his father, to experience the American West, the open range, and the cowboy way of life. He first supplied images for Harper's Weekly illustrating incidents in the military campaign against Geronimo. Other publishers soon asked for his work, including the publishers of Teddy Roosevelt's articles about life among the cowboys. Remington's fanatic attention to details, particularly those regarding horses and the cavalry, lent authenticity to his work. Before he was thirty, Remington worked as a rancher, survived capture by Indians in Dakota territory, rode with the army in military operations against the Indians, and traveled extensively throughout the west. His sketches provided the subject for numerous oils produced in his New Rochelle, New York studio.

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